2

Understanding ‘Mutual Fund Units & NAV

Hello fellow investors

More than 6 months into lockdown, 1 market crash and 1 great recovery, the only constant thing is our learning and our Thursday emails. We started writing our emails soon after lockdown and now we enjoy it so much that we cannot wait for the next Thursday to come and share some insights from the finance world with you. 

In today's email, I am going back to the basics of Mutual Funds and explain what exactly are Mutual Fund Units and NAV and how they help or not help you make investment decisions.


What is a Mutual Fund Unit?


Just as share represent the ownership of Equity, units represent the ownership of Mutual funds. When you invest 5000 INR in a mutual fund and the NAV of the fund is 50 INR - you would get 100 units. 

It is like buying petrol when you go to the petrol pump, you ask them to fille petrol in your car for 1000 INR. If the price per litre is INR 100, you would get 10 litres of petrol in your car.

Let's understand a few facts about Units of Mutual Funds


1. You don't need to buy 1 entire unit of Mutual Fund
You can buy a mutual fund in fractions or parts, it is the amount of money you invest that determines how many units you get. Like when you fill petrol in your car, you tell them fille petrol of INR 1000, if per litre petrol price is 72, you get 13.88 litres of petrol. The same thing happens with Mutual Funds.

 

2. You do not sell all your units to withdraw from Mutual Funds.
As you can partially invest in mutual funds, you can also partially withdraw from mutual funds. You can do that anytime you want (unless they are close-ended schemes)


3. Units are not the same as the share price
Equity Mutual Funds invests in Equity stocks/shares but it does not mean that units are the same thing. The share price is of an individual company and the demand and supply of that particular stock are one of the factors of their share price movements. Such does not happen to mutual fund units.

An average of all the underlying stocks of the mutual funds helps determine the value of each unit which is called as Net Asset Value - NAV.

4. NAV is the price of each unit
The price of each unit of a mutual fund is the NAV. If you want to buy 1 unit of a mutual fund, the price you have to pay is the NAV of that mutual fund’s unit on that day.NAV changes every day. So when the NAV goes up, you gain.

A high NAV does not mean that a particular Mutual Fund is better than the one with a low NAV. NAV price does not determine the value of the Mutual Fund.

NAV= (Total market value of assets invested by the fund-Expenses)/No of Units

5. Mutual fund unit price (NAV) goes up and down

As NAV is determined based on the total market value of the assets invested in by mutual fund which includes shares, bonds, cash, any interest or dividend earned by them and would also capture the movement in the price of shares & bonds, the NAV would also move.

NAV of a fund changes every day where there is a change in the underlying asset, this change helps you know if you are in profit or loss.


Mutual Funds are considered one of the most common forms of investing today, in fact it has generated a lot of wealth for investors who have understood the risk of investing in them and managed it appropriately. We will soon be launching a course on Mutual Funds and more, so stay tuned and keep reading our emailers for a detailed update on the same super soon.

Disclaimer: - The articles are for information purposes only. Information presented is general information that does not take into account your individual circumstances, financial situation, or needs, nor does it present a personalized recommendation to you. You must consult a financial advisor who understands your specific circumstances and situation before taking an investment decision.



6

Mistakes Investors Make That You Should Avoid

Hello fellow investors!

This Thursday, we are sharing a few mistakes that a beginner does when he/she starts investing and it is important that you understand them and act on it accordingly.


1. Not investing

The first and the biggest mistake investors and savers make is not doing it.
Don’t wait for that raise, inheritance, or lottery win. Start today, right now, with whatever you can.

Consider this: If you can save just 100 INR a day every day for 20 years, and earn 12 percent on it, you’ll end up with INR  30,48,395. That’s enough to change your life and the lives of those you love. So let's just start with keeping INR 100 aside.



2. Investing before doing your homework

When it comes to investing in risk assets like stocks, one mistake I’ve made is going on “gut instinct” and 20 minutes of Internet research.

When dealing with investments that can go south, don’t invest without a clue. If you’re thinking about stocks, there’s plenty of online research and information available free, not to mention TV shows and library books.



3. Being impatient


In a post called The 10 Commandments of Wealth and Happiness, the author, Stacy Johnson, offers this advice: Live like you’re going to die tomorrow, but invest like you’re going to live forever.

Stare at a newly planted tree for 24 hours and you’ll be convinced it’s not growing. Fixate on your investments the same way, and you could miss out on a game-changer.

As discussed above, your 100 INR daily grows into 30 lakhs over 20 years, you gotta be consistent and patient.



4. Not diversifying

There are two types of risk in stocks. The first is called market risk: If the entire market tanks, your stocks probably will as well. The other is called company risk: the risk a specific company will do poorly.

It’s hard to eliminate market risk, but you can reduce company risk by investing in lots of companies.

Can’t afford to own a meaningful number of companies? That’s what mutual funds are for. A mutual fund allows you to own a slice of dozens – even hundreds – of companies with an investment of as little as INR 500.



5. Taking too much risk

Everybody wants to double their money overnight. But if you’re always swinging for the fence, you’re going to strike out often.

Some investments are little more than gambling. Investments like options and commodities, for example, promise huge rewards, but the risk is also huge. Don't forget high risk = high returns.



6. Not taking enough risk

On the other side of the same coin, some investors stand like a deer in the headlights, unwilling to take even a measured amount of risk.

Instead, they keep their savings only in fixed deposits and bank, earning less than 6% (which is only reducing) and comforting themselves with Mark Twain’s expression: “I’m more concerned with the return of my money than the return on my money.”

Insured savings will ensure you never lose anything. But they’ll also ensure the purchasing power of your savings won’t keep pace with inflation. In other words, you’ll become poorer over time.



7. Paying too much attention

There is such a thing as information overload. Between the Internet, newspapers, magazines, and cable TV, it’s easy to get more than your fill of conflicting information.

Step back, look at the big picture, find a few financial journalists or others you trust, then tune out the rest.



8. Following the herd

One of the world’s wealthiest men, Warren Buffet, said, “Be fearful when others are greedy; be greedy when others are fearful.”

If you’re convinced the economy is going to zero, buy guns and canned goods. But if you can reasonably expect a recovery someday, invest – even if that day is a long way away, and even if it’s possible things could get worse before they get better.

We have seen the recovery that has happened from the below of March 23, 2020, of the stock market to current where we are almost back to what we were at the beginning of 2020.



9. Holding on when you should be letting go


Equity is best played as a long game. You should hold on long enough to see it through, but not knowing when to get out could cost you big.

Don’t obsess over your investments, but don’t ignore them either.



10. Being overconfident

The economy runs in cycles of boom and bust – when times are good, people often confuse luck with skill.

This is what happened during the housing bubble and the dot.com stock bubble and the past 4 months (March 2020 to July 2020). Being in the right place at the right time isn’t the same as being smart.



11. Failing to adjust

How you invest should change as your life changes. When you’re young, it makes sense to invest aggressively, because you have time to recoup from mistakes.

As you approach retirement age, you should reduce your risk.



12. Not seeking qualified help

While investing isn’t rocket science, if you don’t have the time or temperament, consider getting help.
The wrong help?
A commissioned salesperson more interested in their financial success than yours.
The right help?
A fee-based planner with the right blend of education, knowledge, credentials, and experience - you can contact us at ria.wealthcafe.in

Happy Investing!

Disclaimer: - The emailers are for information purposes only. Information presented is general information that does not take into account your individual circumstances, financial situation, or needs, nor does it present a personalized recommendation to you. You must consult a financial advisor who understands your specific circumstances and situation before taking an investment decision.



5

How can I downsize my portfolio? – Part 2

Hi fellow Investors,

As discussed 2 weeks back (in our article - How many Mutual Funds should you have, an investor should not have more than 5-6 Mutual Funds in his/her portfolio. These should be restricted to 1 Mutual Fund scheme to invest in each Mutual Fund category based on your risk profile, goals, and other requirements. As a follow up to this, we told you that we shall tell you how to downsize/limit your portfolio to 5-6 Mutual Fund schemes.

The simplest way to do this is to first identify which Mutual Fund categories you need to invest in (based on your risk and goals) and identify the right schemes in each category (it is advisable to invest in schemes that are right for you and not look for the best schemes). This will give you your desired holding of Mutual Fund Schemes.

Once you have done that, it is important to take stock of mutual funds that you already have.

Make a list of all your investments in Mutual Funds. To do this, you can download your Consolidated Account Statement from CAMS Online. It will give you transaction wise details of all your mutual fund transactions provided you have used your existing email ID when doing the transactions. Otherwise, if you have an agent or use a platform for investing in mutual funds - you can ask them as well for a holding report.

Compare the existing holding of schemes with the list of desired holding schemes determined above.

SELL unwanted schemes

The way to downsize is to redeem the extra/unwanted schemes and invest the proceeds from the redemption into the desired mutual fund schemes. You can exit from some scheme and buy another scheme in the same category (hence, setting off your loss or gain). You will have to trim your portfolio to reduce it to 5-6 mutual fund schemes.

 

How should you decide what to sell?


Maintain your Asset Allocation

We always tell you to do this and this time around as well, it's the same solution.  Your investments in various asset classes should be made to achieve the right allocation. Even with Mutual Funds, your split between Debt & Equity should be based on your asset allocation. You can read more on this here - https://financial.wealthcafe.in/how-should-you-invest-right-now/


% of your portfolio - Small value funds
 

 You can choose to sell the schemes where the invested amount is low and they are only increasing the number of schemes you hold.


Underperforming funds
 
Analyze the performance of your invested funds and understand which are the funds you should have in your portfolio. Exit from risky funds and poor performing funds. This can be understood by checking the returns of your scheme with the underlying benchmark returns.   
Currently, almost all your investments pre-march would be performing poorly, hence it is important for you to check funds past consistent performance and not just last 2 months' results. 

Minimalism is the key to a cleaner and better portfolio as the reduced number of funds makes it easier for you to analyze your invested funds regularly and also, take a more informed decision with respect to your investments. Also, the cost of managing these funds is reduced.

Where you have just started investing, keep in mind that every time you want to invest more money, you need not invest that in a new mutual fund scheme. You can instead increase your SIP amounts in your existing schemes.


Consult an Advisor
 
Where you already have 15 - 20 Mutual Funds and are finding it difficult to select which ones to keep and which ones to let go, it is advisable to get the assistance of a financial advisor who will go through your risk profile and advise you exactly which mutual funds to hold and for how long. Where you need an advisor/financial planner for your specific financial needs, you can reach out to us at  https://ria.wealthcafe.in/



3

How Many Mutual Funds Should You Have? (Part 1)

This week I am back with some discussion around Mutual Funds. In one of my workshops, during our mutual fund's discussion, I had this one trainee ask me - So what's your number?

I stared at her for a while not knowing what I am supposed to answer to that. Well, she rephrased her question, 'What is the number of mutual funds you are invested in?'  I said, '6 Mutual Funds'.She had the bewildered look on her face wondering how I had so fewer funds. I decided to show her my portfolio.


How many mutual funds schemes should you own? 

Owning around 5-7 mutual fund schemes across various categories is enough. These many mutual fund schemes will help you diversify, do your asset allocation, and also map these investments to your goals. You can invest your savings in the mutual fund schemes as per the below categories:

  1. Large Cap Mutual Fund (Equity)
  2. Large & Mid-Cap Mutual Fund (Equity) (your ELSS tax saving schemes are generally a Large & Mid Cap Mutual Fund)
  3. Mid Cap Mutual Fund (Equity)
  4. Small-Cap Mutual Fund (Equity)
  5. Thematic Mutual Fund (where you understand specific sectors and have a higher risk-taking appetite)  
  6. Short Term Debt Mutual Fund (For your short term goals)
  7. Long Term Debt Mutual Fund (For your long term goals)

In addition to the above, I have one Liquid Mutual Fund where I park my Emergency Funds. You can park your Emergency Fund in a Bank Fixed Deposit as an alternative.


Why only 5-7 Mutual Funds?

When you invest in Mutual Funds, you already diversify your risk across the stocks of the companies a particular mutual fund has invested in. Hence, with a large-cap mutual fund, your risk is diversified across more than 70 stocks that particular large-cap mutual fund has invested in. Investing in three different large-cap funds is not going to reduce your risk further, it will only make your investment portfolio messy.

'Mutual funds investing is to diversify your risk and not to di"worsify" the same'.

Further, reducing the number of schemes to a minimum of 5 also reduces the cost of managing the same and the time that goes in keeping a track of it and analyzing it regularly.


What do I do when I have more savings to Invest?

Increase your investment in the existing mutual fund's schemes you own. 
Investing in a new scheme every time you have extra savings will just lead you to own 15-20 mutual funds schemes with no plan in sight. Hence, it is important to do your due diligence and identify the mutual funds you want to invest in and stick to them. 

Yes, you must review your schemes regularly to see how are they performing in various market cycles but know that all schemes will not give you the best results always. There are some time periods where mid-cap and small-cap schemes will do better, other times when large-cap schemes will outperform and sometimes your debt investments will be the best performer for the year. Hence, it is important to be diversified across categories.


'Every time I check for the best mutual fund scheme and invest in the ones that are on the top' 

Studies have proven that selecting mutual funds based on high-performance track records is naive. The Star rating of various mutual fund keeps changing, a fund that is top rated in this one year, is hardly the top-rated fund in the subsequent years. Tim Courtney, a chief Investment advisor of US-based Burns Advisory did backtesting of past performance of the funds most highly rated, he found that they usually performed poorly after they have gotten 5 ratings. Hulbert financial digest, an investment newsletter found that if investors continually adjusted their mutual funds' holdings to hold only the highest-rated funds, a total stock market index would have beaten them by 45.8 % in the past decade (he studied funds from 1994 to 2004 in the USA). In fact over the years, it has gotten even more difficult to beat the markets and get alpha on your investments.  - extracts from Millionaire extracts - How to build wealth living overseas by Andrew Hallam

Hence, just investing in top-rated schemes is not going to give you the desired returns but only make your portfolio messy and not even get you the best returns.

Wealth cafe Takeaway - While you are investing in 5-7 different schemes across the options stated above, ensure that you invest across various AMCs as well. This will ensure that you are diversifying your risk and your entire money is not with only one AMC.

We shall follow up this article with a part 2 on how to downsize your portfolio.

Until then, keep reading, if you find this helpful, do share it with your friends.

Disclaimer: - The articles are for information purposes only. Information presented is general information that does not take into account your individual circumstances, financial situation, or needs, nor does it present a personalized recommendation to you. You must consult a financial advisor who understands your specific circumstances and situation before taking an investment decision.



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Overnight Funds – What, When and Why to Invest in them

Overnight Funds are the least risky mutual funds. They are less risky than the Liquid Mutual Funds as well.

This is a type of debt fund with practically no interest rate fluctuation risk and credit rating risk and low credit default risk. Overnight Funds are like investing in your savings bank account with slightly higher returns. This money can be part of your emergency fund or just money that you want to keep aside for a while for whatever reason without worrying about gains.

What is an overnight Mutual Fund work?

It is a debt mutual fund that invests in bonds that mature in one day! So at the start of each business day, the entire AUM would be in cash, overnight bonds would be purchased, they will mature the next business day, the fund manager would take the cash and buy more overnight bonds and so on. So each the NAV increase just a little bit due to the interest income.

Interest Rate Risk – If a bond matures the next business day, its price will not be affected if RBI changes the (overnight) interest rate. Next day, your bonds mature and you will buy new overnight bonds at the new rate.

Credit Rating Risk – If the credit rating of the bond issuer changes, the bond price will not be affected as your bond will mature the next day.

Default Risk –  There is a risk only if the issuer of the bond absconds with your money or refuses to pay up: credit default risk.  To manage this risk, there is collateral from the bond issuer. However, not fully covered, it still offers some protection for this risk.

In what product do these funds invest in?

Overnight funds invest in debt instruments with one day to maturity. When the bonds mature, the fund reinvests the proceeds in the next set of one-day instruments. The risk from default or fall in value within a day is negligible. Typically, the funds invest in collateralized borrowing and lending agreements (CBLO), a short term borrowing facility backed by securities of the central government through which mutual funds lend to banks and others, and reverse repos. Both of these are protected from credit risk since they are backed by collateral securities. The schemes may also invest in money market instruments such as treasury bills, certificates of deposit and commercial papers with residual maturity of not more than a day. If the interest rate for the day is high, the returns from overnight funds are up and vice-versa, with no impact on the value of the securities.

Who should choose overnight funds?

Anyone who wants to park money with the least amount of risk without worrying about returns.

A business owner who has a current account and thus, does not earn any interest on the cash lying in his/her account can invest in overnight funds to make some gains on their working capital.

Liquid Funds or Overnight Funds

Liquid funds holding securities with the highest credit quality will still earn better returns than overnight funds given that they hold securities with 25-30 days to maturity, while overnight funds cater to the need for a liquid investment with negligible risk for investors looking to park their funds for very short periods of time (a day maybe). 

Many liquid funds allow investors to withdraw up to 50,000 instantly, and offers useful online features, looking for a steady short-term ride or parking funds for your emergency needs – liquid funds are still preferable.

However, recently SEBI has announced certain changes where they have said there will be an exit load associated with liquid funds. However, the exact % and the impact of it is not yet announced. Once that is there, the investor will have to take an overall call based on the returns and the cost of investment.

Wealth Cafe Actionable – If you can manage a little risk, invest in overnight funds every Friday and withdraw the same on Monday earning gains over the weekend.

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What is SWP? How it works?

What is a Systematic Withdrawal Plan?

Systematic Withdrawal Plan is used to redeem your investment from a mutual fund scheme in a phased manner. Unlike lump-sum withdrawals, SWP enables you to withdraw money in installments. It can be viewed as the opposite of SIP. In SIP, you channelize your bank account savings into the preferred mutual fund scheme. Whereas in SWP, you channelize your investments from the scheme to the savings bank account. It is one of the strategies to deal with market fluctuations.

With the Systematic Withdrawal Plan, you can customize the cash flow as per your requirement. You can choose to either withdraw just the capital gains on your investment or a fixed amount. This way you will not only have your money still invested in the scheme, but you will also be able to access regular income and returns. The money that you withdraw can be used to reinvest in some other fund or can be retained by you in the form of cash.

Types of SWP –

There are 2 types of SWP

  1. Fixed SWP – where a fixed sum is withdrawn from the mutual fund on the set date, irrespective of the fund’s performance, hence, this method can erode your capital when the fund has not performed very well.
  2. Appreciation SWP – where only the gains (appreciation) that have happened in the scheme are redeemed on the set SWP date. Avoiding erosion of capital but can lead to erratic numbers each month.

How does SWP work?

An SWP gives surety of a stable payout to the investors at predetermined intervals. This implies that at some stage the investments will be completely repaid along with the gains in the hand of a mutual fund investor.

Hence, an investor is assured of getting a fixed amount at his/her pre-determined frequency through an SWP.

  • If the fund’s performance is good, the SWP will last longer.
  • If the performance is poor, it’ll finish sooner.
  • If your annual withdrawal is less than what the fund generates every year, you can continue earning from this mutual fund forever.

Why do I need to set up an SWP?

  • Manage the market risk  – SWP like SIP helps you to reduce your market volatility risk by averaging your return over a period of time. If you withdraw/deposit lumpsum amount at a given point of time, you are bearing the risk of markets going up or down after that. Through SWP, you are distributing it over a period of time. Where the markets are up, you make higher gains and vice versa. SWP is automatically doing that for you, you do not have to keep a continuous tab on the market.

Just as Systematic Investment Plans (SIP) avoid market risk at the time of investment, SWPs lower market risk at the time of redemption.

  • Regular Income for your family on retirement or otherwise – For retirees with huge corpus and need for regular income, SWP is a great option. Through this, the retirees can invest in mutual funds and set up SWP  equivalent to the amount they need each month for their regular expenses.
  • The second stream of income – For someone who wants additional income each month and has a large corpus that they have invested. SWP can work as a good option.
  • Reduced Taxation as compared to the dividend option – the redemption from SWP is taxable based on the mutual fund – debt or equity. Each SWP gains are taxable. However, even the dividends that you shall receive from the dividend option mutual funds are taxable. Hence, it is important to consider the tax impact before taking an investment decision.

Spreading investment over the right time period is the key. The STP can be done over a time period of three to four months or across several years. Investors are frequently at a loss as to how many monthly installments to break up the investments into. Since there is no underlying inflow as in the case of a salary that feeds a SIP, this is entirely at the discretion of the investor.

Consider the example of someone who came into R20 lakh in December 2007 and then invested it all in an equity fund. In four months, the money would be reduced to less than R10 lakh. In some cases, funds could have gone down to R5 or 6 lakh. After taking such a big hit, a person may never invest again. It will take about six years for him to break even. However, suppose this investor had invested gradually over 12 months. In that case, only about a tenth of the money would lose a lot of its value. Overall, averaging over a year, the acquisition cost would be such that the investment would hardly ever be in a loss. Of course, I’ve taken an extreme example to illustrate the concept, one that takes the investor from an all-time high peak to a low point. You could have started a little earlier, say in 2006 and then spread the investment over a longer period.

However, if you actually look back at the markets over the last decade, you will realize that while an STP generally helps one avoid a market peak and average costs, they are not a foolproof device.

Equity is equity and there’s no way of doing away all risks. However, based on what has happened over the last two decades in India, stretching an investment over two to three years is likely to capture enough of a market cycle to significantly reduce risk.

An Example of SWP

You have a corpus of INR 3 lakhs that you have decided to invest in a debt mutual fund and set up SWP of INR 10,000 each month. SWP of INR 10,000 will be redeemed from the mutual fund each month on the set date and that money will be transferred to your bank account. After the redemption, the balance amount in the mutual fund will be invested to grow.

Wealth Cafe Actionable – SWP works better when a person has invested and accumulated a significant sum (with respect to the withdrawal one is seeking). In a small investment, if the return generated is less than the regular payouts, it will fast erode capital. Also, when the markets are doing good, SWP will erode your capital and your invested amount will be redeemed. Balanced Funds are a good option to invest in while doing an SWP as it is taxed like a debt mutual fund but has 35% equity to help the corpus grow faster.

 

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What is an STP and how does it work?

What is STP?

Now almost every investor is familiar with the Systematic Investment Plan (SIP).  While SIP is the transfer of money from savings to a mutual fund plan, STP means transferring money from one mutual fund to another.

STP is a smart strategy to stagger your investment over a specific term to reduce risks and balance returns. For instance, if you invest ‘systematically’ in equity, you can earn risk-free returns even during volatile market scenarios. Here, an AMC permits you to put a lump sum in one fund, and transfer a fixed amount to another scheme regularly. The former fund is called source scheme or transferor scheme, and the latter is called the target scheme or destination scheme.

How does STP work?

One opts for an STP when there is a lump sum to invest and want to spread the risk of investing in one go over a period of time. Like a SIP, an STP helps spread out investments over a period of time to average the purchase cost and rule out the risk of getting into the market at its peak.

While Investing

However, with an STP, you invest a lump sum in one scheme (mostly a debt scheme) and transfer a fixed amount from this scheme regularly to another scheme (mostly an equity scheme).

The basic idea behind an STP is to earn a little extra on the lump sum while it is being deployed in equity since debt funds provide better returns than a normal savings bank account.

While Redemption

STP is also done from an Equity Fund to a debt Fund when you are approaching your long term goals for which you had invested in Equity Funds, you do not wait till the last day to redeem your investments. You start transferring your funds 2-3 years before the goal date to your debt fund. Now, where the markets are not at its best, you can do an STP from equity to debt. Where the market is very good, you could opt for a lumpsum transfer.

How to make the most of your STP investments?

As we had discussed in the Article – Why you should avoid timing the markets for your SIP and SIP’s automatically make the most of the market changes and help you average the cost of making mutual fund investments.  STP’s work on similar lines. STPs are also a method of making regular investments in mutual funds.

In STPs, you transfer funds from one mutual fund scheme to another, periodically.

Every month, a fixed sum flows into the investment, leading to cost averaging and eventual high returns. However, when it comes to investing a lump sum amount, you are faced with the challenge of how to manage the market risk. For anyone who has understood the efficacy of SIP, the right way to go about this kind of an investment is to put it into a liquid fund, and then do a monthly transfer from there.

Taxation of an STP

When you transfer from one mutual fund scheme to another, it is considered as sale and the same is taxable as per Mutual Fund taxation provisions.

In case of debt funds, if your holding period is less than 36 months, then the amount that you withdraw will form a part of your income. It will then be taxed according to your income slab. On the other hand, if the holding period is more than 36 months, then the long-term capital gains will be taxed at 20% with indexation.

In case of equity funds, if your holding period is less than 1 year, then the withdrawn amount will be taxed at the rate of 15%. On the other hand, if the holding period is more than 1 year, then the long-term capital gains will be taxed at 10% without indexation.

Wealth Cafe Actionable: Where you are a regular SIP investor and want to distribute your market risk and make use of cost averaging, Invest your lumpsum gains such as bonus, wedding gifts, etc into a liquid fund and set up an STP into an equity Fund

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When is the right time to start your investments?

In our workshops, we have discussed with so many people who say that they are waiting for the markets to go down to start their investments or they are waiting to have enough before they start. Some may even argue to say that they want to enjoy life today and will invest tomorrow (in spite of having enough savings in their bank account). Some feel they are just waiting for the right time to start investing.

The RIGHT time to start your Investments is NOW

The best time was yesterday, but now that is gone right time is today. With every day you push to invest your money, you are reducing your money from growing and making wealth for you.

If you are following the basic rules, you will definitely get it right. It is quite usual for you to feel a bit nervous when you are investing in unfamiliar instruments for the first time. But you will learn on the way. So, don’t let your nervousness delay your investments further.

To help you understand what you are missing every time you are delaying your investment choice, we have tabulated below an example:

PriyaShreya
Sip50005000
SIP start Age2530
SIP Stop Age3060
Investment till Age6060
SIP done for how long (in years)530
Amount Invested 25,0001,50,000
At the age of 60, returns they got22,32,12521,73,726

In the above example, Priya started at the age of 25 and invested for only 5 years, until she was 30. However, she did not withdraw her investment out until she was 60.

On the other, Shreya started her investment only at the age of 30 and continued to invest until she was 60. She invested around INR 150,000 and Priya invested around INR 25,000.

You would obviously expect Shreya to make more money than Priya. But, it is Priya who has made great returns from just an investment of INR 25,000. This is the power of starting early.

When you start your investments today, you have to invest less and you will reach your goals sooner.

START NOW !!

It is possible that some of you may be anxious as to how should you start your investment and where to put your money. For all of you do not worry, doing a SIP for your mutual fund is a great start and we have written many blogs on how should you invest and are writing more.

Always try to match your goals with your investment choice. This will help you eliminate unwanted choices, and identify the right ones. It will also save you a lot of headaches later. As a rule, avoid risky investments like stocks, equity mutual funds for short-term goals (3 years and less than 3 years). This is because equity can be extremely risky and volatile in the short-term. You should try to preserve your capital and try to secure stable returns for short-term needs. However, if you have time in hand, you can be a little adventurous and invest in equity. It will help you earn a few extra percentages. This is because equity has the potential to give higher returns than any other asset class over a long period of time.

Don’t forget to review your investments periodically. Investing and forgetting all about it is not a great strategy. You should regularly check how your investments have done over a period of time.

Wealth Cafe Actionable – Where you are investing in Equity for long term goals, do not forget to sell your risky investments at least three years before your goal and park the proceeds in a safe avenue. This is to ensure that you have the money safely parked somewhere when you need it and the market risk will not hamper your goals. Start your investments now!!

 

 



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